Quantity:
BUY CD $12.95
BUY MP3 $4.99

Dreamflight

NA1010

Liz Gorrill, solo piano

1. You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To
2. Chord Storm
3. It Could Happen to You
4. Pulsation
5. A Different Shade of Melancholy
6. We'll Remember May
7. Thrill Me  

DREAM SEQUENCE
8. Blues from a Subterranean Galaxy
9. Dreamflight
10. Deep Awakening

Recorded in concert May 18, 1990, Greenwich House, New York NY



REVIEWS

This is hardcore solo piano in the universe of Lennie Tristano and Cecil Taylor:  knotty free improv marked by pounding, massive odd chords, then sudden lyrical delicacy . . . Gorrill's inner trip is as harrowing and exhilarating as white-water boating, and just as breathtaking.
— Wif Stenger, New York Press

 

Thick clusters of notes and right-hand filigree that travel off at strange angles, all held together by an insistent swing . . . an originality that makes tracing her influences difficult . . . Gorrill clearly is a major pianist.
— John Baxter, Option

 

It's difficult, uncompromising music that is well worth hearing . . . she takes it to lengths and weights that can suggest Busoni . . . the final "Deep Awakening," along with numerous other moments in the performance, has such kinetic energy that it levitates not only itself but the burdens of history.
— Stuart Broomer, Coda

 

Liz Gorrill's music is a complex, densely textured exploration of time and space.  Gorrill speaks in a unique voice.
— Robert Iannapolo, Cadence

 

This latest solo piano concert recording for Gorrill is another testament to her individuality . . . a mysterious, personal inner world is opened to the listener . . . music that demands close attention but rewards you well for the commitment.
— Lois Moody, Ottawa Citizen

 

Liz's playing is so "dense" that it's impossible to put into words, the way Elliott Carter, Lennie Tristano (her teacher), and the Berg Violin Concerto all fail to be summed up with words.  That's the frustration of writing a review — yet this is the very sort of music that most appeals to me to review.  Liz doesn't play "songs."  She plays the piano, in all its colors, growls, and roars.  This music isn't for someone who seeks what's already familiar — with Liz you never know where she's going to take you, or even if you'll like it when you get there.  And, in my opinion, her playing is closer to modern "classical" music than it is to "jazz."  If you dig Webern, Messiaen, Prokofiev, Tristano and "cats" like that, you're going to love this CD.  Fasten your seatbelt . . . an amazing jazz recital.
— John Grabowski, Amazon.com

 

 

.